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Yesterday I had four (!) speaker meetings with 4 fellow professional speakers. One with a speaker from Malaysia who drove to Singapore to met with me, one with a speaker from India who flew in to meet with me, one with a speaker from Germany who skyped in to meet with me – and in the evening at 8 to 10 pm – with Vicky Vaswani and Hitesh Ramchandani who came home to my house after the kids had gone to sleep to meet with me. I must have talked about speaking with speakers for 6+ hours. What an inspiring day that helped me expand my thinking about speaking.
How much time are you putting aside to learn from fellow speakers – and to teach fellow speakers?

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“How do you go from being a speaker speaking in your home country to becoming a global speaker?”

That is one of the most common questions I get as a global speaker myself. The people asking are often very professional and successful authors.

I got that questions today again when I was speaking at an event in Pune, India where we were meeting to create Professional Speakers Association of India (See

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProfessionalSpeakersAssociationIndia/  if you want to learn more about this.)

The person asking was Mitesh Khatri, an expert on leadership and the law of attraction.

When I heard the question I gave a reply that, at first, might seem a bit provocative. I said: “The biggest mistake is to think in the way that makes you even ask that question.”

By that I meant that to be an international or global speaker the most important thing for a speaker to do is to stop thinking that speaking in another country is different. It’s not. At least not even close to as different than what people think.

Since I was in India I asked Mitesh Khatri a follow up question: “Do you think “How do I get to speak in the south of India? Of course you don’t.”

And then I added: “So why do you say: “How do I get to speak in Sri Lanka?” (Which is just a bit more south of the south of India.)

I could see how something clicked in Mitesh Khatri’s head.

And that is exactly what I wanted to happen.

If you think “speaking internationally” is vastly different from “speaking nationally” and that there are huge changes you need to do in order to break the speaking-outside-your-home-country-barrier then that fear is in itself will stop you from making it happen.